thumbnail

By On August 14, 2018

Dozens Of Cars Torched By Masked Youths In Western Sweden, Authorities Say

Enlarge this image

Burned cars are pictured at Froelunda Square in Gothenburg, Sweden, on Tuesday. Up to 80 cars have been set on fire in western Sweden by masked vandals, police say. Adam Ihse/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Adam Ihse/AFP/Getty Images

Burned cars are pictured at Froelunda Square in Gothenburg, Sweden, on Tuesday. Up to 80 cars have been set on fire in western Sweden by masked vandals, police say.

Adam Ihse/AFP/Getty Images

Dozens of cars were set on fire overnight in western Sweden, in a series of attacks that Swedish authorities suspect may have been coordinated on social media.

Up to 80 cars were torched in Gothenburg, Sweden's second-largest city, as well as other nearby towns, Radio Sweden reports. Authorities say that groups of masked young people are responsible.

And the country's leaders are not happy.

"I am really furious," Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven said in an interview with Radio Sweden, as translated by The Guardian. "What the hell are they up to?"

Justice and Home Affairs Minister Morgan Johansson called the attacks "despicable," according to The Local, writing on Twitter, "Last year the government tightened the punishment for aggravated vandalism, which can now give up to six years in jail. Hope the thugs get arrested so that they get the punishment they deserved."

Video sent to The Local Sweden showed cars being set on fire in a Gothenburg suburb. A group of people entirely clad in black â€" including masks covering their faces â€" are seen moving through a parking lot and throwing incendiary devices under cars. The news website says people threw stones and torched cars in several Gothenburg districts.

The car attacks are part of a larger pattern, according to Reuters and Radio Sweden: Over the past few years, apparently, Swedish towns have repeatedly experienced violence or car burnings shortly before the end of summer break.

The late-summer timing also could have political consequences.

"Sweden goes to the polls on [Sept. 9] with violent crime high on the political agenda, after a spate of shootings and grenade attacks, largely in deprived areas with large concentrations of immigrants," the Guardian notes.

< p>Car torching is often a feature of larger riots, as Stockholm witnessed in 2013. But that's not what happened in Gothenberg. Despite the widespread property damage, there have been no reports of injuries, the BBC says.

This is not the first time Sweden has faced a spate of stand-alone, seemingly coordinated car fires.

In 2016, there were a series of car burning attacks over the summer, including one night when cars were torched in towns from Stockholm to Malmo. In 2017, multiple cars were set on fire in various locations in Malmo.

In 2016, CityLab explored Scandinavian car arson and noted that some people theorized the car burnings were part of an insurance fraud scheme.

"Others have seen the burnings as an expression of rage from young men who see no other outlet for it, or find that the attention it gets them a kick," Feargus O'Sullivan wrote. "Still others have pointed toward Scandina via's growing social ills as the grey eminence behind the burnings."

Source: Google News Sweden | Netizen 24 Sweden

thumbnail

By On August 14, 2018

Youths Burn Cars In Sweden Rampage

Terms of Service Violation

Your usage has been flagged as a violation of our terms of service.

For inquiries related to this message please contact support. For sales inquiries, please visit http://www.bloomberg.com/professional/request-demo

If you believe this to be in error, please confirm below that you are not a robot by clicking "I'm not a robot" below.


Please make sure your browser supports JavaScript and cookies and that you are not blocking them from loading. For more information you can review the Terms of Service and Cookie Policy.


Block reference ID:

Source: Google News Sweden | Netizen 24 Sweden

thumbnail

By On August 14, 2018

Dozens of cars are torched in Sweden. Prime minister asks, 'What the heck are you doing?'

Jan M. OlsenAssociated Press

Masked youths torched dozens of cars overnight in Sweden and threw rocks at police, prompting an angry response from the prime minister, who denounced an "extremely organized" night of vandalism.

About 80 cars were set ablaze overnight, chiefly in Sweden's second largest city, Goteborg, and nearby Trollhattan, an industrial city, and fires were also reported on a smaller scale in Malmo, Sweden's third largest city, police said Tuesday.

In Trollhattan, northeast of Goteborg, where at least six cars were burned, rocks were also thrown at police and roads were blocked. Goteborg is 250 miles southwest of Stockholm.

Police noted the fires started within a short period of time and believe "there is a connection between the blazes."

"As of now we have no motive whatsoever," police spokesman Christer Fuxborg told The Associated Press. "Our theory is that the fires have somehow been coordinated on social media like Snapchat but we do not know why."

Local newspaper Goteborg-Posten noted police in recent days have been active in pursuing drug dealers in the Frolunda, a suburb of Goteborg where some the fires took place.

"Honestly we do not know whether this has something to do with it," Fuxborg said.

Photos posted by Swedish tabloid Aftonbladet showed black-clad men torching cars on a parking lot near Goteborg.

Sweden's news agency TT said witnesses had seen "masked youngsters" running away.

Several youths that police met at the scene have been identified.

"We have spoken with them but we cannot conclude they started the fires. We also hav e spoken with their parents," Fuxberg said, adding police were in the early stages of the investigation.

Two people, aged 16 and 21 and living in Frolunda were detained for questioning, Fuxborg said. More suspects likely could be detained.

Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven lashed out at the perpetrators, asking them: "What the heck are you doing?"

In an interview on Swedish radio, he said he was "really getting mad" and that "society must react in a tough manner." He said the fires seemed to be "extremely organized."

No injuries have been reported. However, the fires occupy police and rescue officials and frighten residents.

"You damage residential areas and ruin it for your neighbors," Lofven said.

"I am speechless. This so terrible, it's destructive and it's pure evil," Jonas Ransgaard, a member of the Goteborg City council, told local daily Goteb orgs-Posten.

  • Car plows through crowd outside Parliament in London; 1 man in custody as police treat as terrorism

  • Bridge collapse leaves 20 dead, 13 injured in Italy as cars plunge nearly 150 feet into rubble

  • President Trump calls former aide Omarosa a 'dog' after release of audio recordings

Copyright © 2018, Chicago Tribune
  • Europe
Source: Google News Sweden | Netizen 24 Sweden

thumbnail

By On August 14, 2018

Swedish PM 'really' mad at horde of masked youths who torched 80 cars, threw rocks at police

sweden arson cars burned
Cars burn in Sweden's second largest city, Goteborg.
BNO via Twitter

  • Masked youths torched dozens of cars overnight in Sweden and threw rocks at police, prompting an angry response from the prime minister, who called it "extremely organized" vandalism.
  • Police spokesman Hans Lippens said Tuesday that initial reports indicate that about 80 cars were set ablaze overnight, chiefly in Sweden's second largest city, Goteborg.
  • Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven is lashing out at those who set fire to dozens of cars in southwest Sweden, asking them "what the heck are you doing?"

COPENHAGEN, Denm ark (AP) â€"Masked youths torched dozens of cars overnight in Sweden and threw rocks at police, prompting an angry response from the prime minister, who denounced an "extremely organized" night of vandalism.

Police spokesman Hans Lippens said Tuesday that initial reports indicate that about 80 cars were set ablaze overnight, chiefly in Sweden's second largest city, Goteborg, and nearby Trollhattan, an industrial city.

Fires were also reported on a smaller scale in Malmo, Sweden's third largest city.

Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven is lashing out at those who set fire to dozens of cars in southwest Sweden, asking them "what the heck are you doing?"

Lofven says in a Swedish radio interview that he is "really getting mad," adding that "the society must react in a tough manner."

Police spokesman Hans Lippens said Tuesday that initial reports indicate that about 80 cars were set ablaze overnigh t, chiefly in Sweden's second largest Goteborg and nearby Trollhattan, an industrial city.

Lippens added that because the fires started within a short period of time, "we cannot exclude that there is a connection between the blazes."

Photos posted by Swedish tabloid Aftonbladet showed black-clad men torching cars on a parking lot near Goteborg.

Sweden's news agency TT said witnesses had seen "masked youngsters" running away. No arrests have been made.

Lippens said several youths that police met at the scene have been identified.

"We have spoken with them but we cannot conclude they started the fires. We also have spoken with their parents," he told local media. He was not available for further comments.

Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Lofven lashed out at the perpetrators, asking them: "What the heck are you doing?"

In an interview on Swedish radio, he said he was "really getting mad" and that "society must react in a tough manner." He said the fires seemed to be "extremely organized."

No injuries have been reported. However, the fires occupy police and rescue officials and frighten residents.

"You damage residential areas and ruin it for your neighbors," Lofven said.

"I am speechless. This so terrible, it's destructive and it's pure evil," Jonas Ransgaard, a member of the Goteborg City council, told local daily Goteborgs-Posten.

Source: Google News Sweden | Netizen 24 Sweden