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By On November 07, 2018

Canada opens Four Nations Cup with rout of Sweden

RecapCanada opens Four Nations Cup with rout of SwedenMelodie Daoust scored a pair of goals in Canada's 6-1 win over Sweden at the Four Nations Cup women's hockey tournament Tuesday.

Host nation faces American rivals Wednesday in preliminary action

Canada forward Melodie Daoust, seen above, scored two goals in a 6-1 win over Sweden at the Four Nations Cup women's hockey tournament in Saskatoon on Tuesday. (Liam Richards/Canadian Press)

Melodie Daoust scored a pair of goals in Canada's 6-1 win over Sweden at the Four Nations Cup women's hockey tournament Tuesday.

Sarah Fillier scored in her national-team debut and Laura Stacey scored short-handed for the host country at the SaskTel Centre.

Captain Marie-Philip Poulin a nd Hamilton defender Laura Fortino rounded out the scoring for Canada.

Rebecca Johnson assisted on three goals. Goaltender Shannon Szabados stopped 17 of 18 shots for the win.

Emma Nordin scored a power-play goal for Sweden in the third period. Goaltender Lovisa Selander, 22, stopped 46 of 52 shots in her first start for her country.

Canada, U.S. rivalry continues

Canada meets defending champion United States in a preliminary-round game Wednesday.

It will be their first meeting since the Americans edged the Canadians 3-2 in a shootout for Olympic gold in February.

The two countries with the best records at the conclusion of the round robin meet in Saturday's final. The third and fourth seeds will play for bronze.

Former national-team defender Ylva Martinsen has taken over as coach of a young Swedish side that has five teenagers on its Four Nations roster.

The Swedes struggled to generate sustained pressure in the offensive zone against Canada. Erika Grahm put a shot off Canada's post in the first period.

Americans defeat Finland with balanced attack

Earlier Tuesday, the U.S. scored five unanswered goals in the second period to down Finland 5-1.

Brianna Decker, Hilary Knight, Sarah Brodt and Dani Cameranesi each had a goal and an assist for the U.S. Cayla Barnes also scored for the Americans.

Maddie Rooney, who backstopped the U.S. to gold in Pyeongchang, South Korea, turned away nine of 10 shots for the win over the Finns.

Veteran netminder Noora Raty was the busier of the two goalies, repelling 44 of 49 shots in the loss. Emma Nuutinen scored Finland's lone goal.

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More Stories from usSource: Google News Sweden | Netizen 24 Sweden

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By On November 07, 2018

The people and stories behind some of Sweden's common street names

Whether you're wandering the cobbled lanes of a historic centre or doing some window-shopping on a busy central street, at some point you might start to wonder about all the people who trod the same path before you.

Sweden's streets have stories to tell, and some of them are hidden in plain sight, in the names of roads and paths which pay homage to Swedes of decades and centuries past.

Birger Jarl

Birger Jarl is a big name in the history of Sweden and particularly the capital, since he is believed to have founded Stockholm in the 13th century â€" that claim is sometimes disputed, but it's true that Stockholm became much more important under his rule, which also saw him establish closer ties with Sweden's neighbouring countries.

'Jarl' is actually a title, which at the time was given to members of Sweden's various royal families who were next in line to the throne. Birger was the last person to hold the title.


Picture: Public Domain, Link

Olof Palme

Probably Sweden's most famous prime minister, Olof Palme led Sweden's Social Democrats for 17 years and governed the country between 1969-76 and 1982-1986. He was well known for his speaking and debating skills, so it's no surprise that he founded Almedalen, Sweden's annual politics festival which sees the political party leaders gather on Gotland for a week of speeches each summer. The event is sometimes called Palmedalen in reference to his founding role.

Sadly he is best known for his murder in 1986, which was the first assassination of a national leader since the 18th century â€" and remains unsolved to this day. He was shot at close range while w alking home from the cinema with his wife Lisbet and no bodyguard.

In Stockholm, the street that bears Palme's name was formerly known as Tunnelgatan and was renamed after the prime minister was shot there. Social Democrats often leave red roses at the spot as a sign of respect and remembrance. Streets and memorials around the world, from Algeria to Russia, also carry his name.


Olof Palme. Photo: Paolo Rodriguez/TT

Erik Dahlbergh

Another street you'll find in many Swedish cities and towns takes its name from this engineer and soldier, born in 1625.

Although born into the peasant class, Dahlbergh proved himself as a capable military man during the many wars that took place through his lifetime, rising to the ranks of nobility. Earlier, he trained as a scribe and archi tect, travelling around Europe in the mid-1600s and becoming particularly well-known for his designs of fortifications.

He died at the age off 77, a field marshal, and was buried in a tomb of his own design.


Picture: Public Domain

Sankt Erik

Another famous Erik, the man who gives his name to Sankt Eriksgatans across the country and Stockholm's Sankt Eriksplan went by many monikers, Erik the Holy and Erix IX of Sweden being the other two most common. It is his face which is depicted on Stockholm's coat of arms. But not a lot is actually known about his life, dating to around 1120-1160.

He is generally portrayed as a fair and just ruler who supported the rights of the oppressed, but it's debatable whether this should be taken at face value. He is known for consolidating the reli gion of Christianity across Sweden and for codifying the country's laws.

Erik died at the hands of rebels who are said to have accosted the king during an Ascension Day Feast, pulling him from his horse and beheading him.


Erik's face adorns the Stockholm flag. Photo: By Holger.Ellgaard - Own work, Public Domain, Link

Magnus Ladulås

Magnus Ladulås is a Swedish king usually known as Magnus III of Sweden outside his home country. You'll find streets and a Stockholm pub named after him. He was the second son of Birger Jarl and came to power after ousting his brother from the throne, after which he ruled from 1275 until he died in 1290 at the age of 50. He is buried in a tomb in Riddarholmskyrkan in Stockholm's old town.

In 2011, a team of archaeologists got permission to open the tomb and e xamine the presumed remains â€" only to find out that they were around 200 years too young to belong to the king.


Picture: By Fresco al secco in Överselö kyrka,Sweden. Photo by Klafui, Public Domain, Link

Dag Hammarskjöld

Dag Hammarskjöld was the second Secretary-General of the UN, becoming the youngest person to hold the post at the age of 47, and generally regarded as one of the most skilled diplomats to do so. US President John F Kennedy hailed Hammarskjöld as "the greatest statesman of our time" and staff praised him for his efforts in mingling even with junior level staff.

He was one of 16 people killed in a plane crash in 1961 while en route to negotiate a cease-fire, in a disaster whose circumstances remain murky. He was posthumously awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, and as well as streets named after him across Swede n and as far afield as the USA, several universities have named libraries and rooms after the distinguished diplomat.


Pictured in 1956. Photo: SvD/TT

Torkel Knutsson

This 13th-century royal advisor's name is sometimes spelled Torgils or Tyrgils, and was a member of the privy council but in practice ruled Sweden while King Birger Magnusson, who ascended to the throne at the age of ten, was too young to do so.

He was supposedly faithful to the royal family, taking the king's side in one dispute between the royal and his two brothers and helping quash their rebellion â€" but when the brothers later gained the king's trust, they turned him against Knutsson, who was executed in Stockholm.

A Stockholm street was named after him in 1885, when many of the capital's roads were renamed in order to get rid of double n ames and lessen confusion, as well as to consolidate longer streets which had previously had different names in different parts.


Image: This file is from the Mechanical Curator collection, a set of over 1 million images scanned from out-of-copyright books and released to Flickr Commons by the British Library. View image on Flickr View all images from book View catalogue entry for book. , Public Domain, Link

Source: Google News Sweden | Netizen 24 Sweden

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By On November 06, 2018

Canadian women's hockey team downs Sweden 6-1 at Four Nations Cup

SASKATOON -- Melodie Daoust scored a pair of goals in Canada's 6-1 win over Sweden at the Four Nations Cup women's hockey tournament Tuesday.

Sarah Fillier scored in her national-team debut and Laura Stacey scored short-handed for the host country at the SaskTel Centre.

Captain Marie-Philip Poulin and Hamilton defender Laura Fortino rounded out the scoring for Canada.

Rebecca Johnson assisted on three goals. Goaltender Shannon Szabados stopped 17 of 18 shots for the win.

Emma Nordin scored a power-play goal for Sweden in the third period. Goaltender Lovisa Selander, 22, stopped 46 of 52 shots in her first start for her country.

Canada meets defending champion United States in a preliminary-round game Wednesday.

It will be their first meeting since the Americans edged the Canadians 3-2 in a shootout for Olympic gold in Februar y.

The two countries with the best records at the conclusion of the round robin meet in Saturday's final. The third and fourth seeds will play for bronze.

Former national-team defender Ylva Martinsen has taken over as coach of a young Swedish side that has five teenagers on its Four Nations roster.

The Swedes struggled to generate sustained pressure in the offensive zone against Canada. Erika Grahm put a shot off Canada's post in the first period.

Earlier Tuesday, the U.S. scored five unanswered goals in the second period to down Finland 5-1.

Brianna Decker, Hilary Knight, Sarah Brodt and Dani Cameranesi each had a goal and an assist for the U.S. Cayla Barnes also scored for the Americans.

Maddie Rooney, who backstopped the U.S. to gold in Pyeongchang, South Korea, turned away nine of 10 shots for the win over the Finns.

Veteran netminder Noora Raty was the busier of the two goalies, repelling 44 of 49 shots in the loss. Emma Nuutinen scored Finland's lone goal.

Source: Google News Sweden | Netizen 24 Sweden

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By On November 06, 2018

'In northern Sweden we lock our door to shut out the friendly people'

This article is available to Members of The Local. Read more Membership Exclusives here.

My girlfriend and I were watching the final episode of the last season of The Bridge when it happened. A dark car rolled slowly past our house, car stereo bassline juddering. Through the windows of our living room, I could see youths in the car.

Instinct kicked in and I leapt off the sofa, slipped on some shoes, grabbed the keys to my truck, and rushed out the front door. The car rumbled slowly past in the other direction as I opened the door of the truck.

They'd reached the dead end of the track that runs past our house and had doubled back.

I backed our truck out of the driveway. The car was now about 200 metres up our track, heading towards the main road. I could catch them if I put the pedal to the metal.

The last time I'd seen this kind of driving â€" hooded youths in a dark, bass-filled, slow-moving car â€" had been in Shoreditch, in east London, where we lived before moving to rural northern Sweden.

It usually meant one thing â€" they were looking for empty houses for a spot of opportunist burglary.

As a born-and-bred Londoner, I dealt regularly with dodgy characters in urban environs.

I'd confronted a gang of youths who had intimidated my girlfriend as she tried to enter our apartment block in Shoreditch and had also â€" at 3am in the morning in my t-shirt and boxers â€" apprehended a ham-fisted burglar who'd woken me up while trying to break into a shop adjacent to our apartment.

I wasn't going to put up with this nonsense in northern Sweden, I thought, as I put my foot down and began my pursuit of the slow-moving car.

I was quickly gaining on the car as it headed towards the main road. I tried to formulate a plan as I drove. What w as I going to do when I caught them? Run them off the road? Too extreme. Follow them with my lights on full-beam? Might be a plan.

Just then, the car indicated right and pulled into a neighbour's driveway.

It suddenly clicked. The driver of the car was Robert, our neighbour's teenage son.

And he'd been driving slowly because he had just started to learn to drive.

He'd been on an impromptu driving lesson, not casing our house.

His taste in music may have been questionable but so was my girlfriend's and I wouldn't force her off the road just for liking Dua Lipa (can't say it hasn't crossed my mind, though).

My London paranoia had overwhelmed me again. We've lived for six-and-a-half years in a rural village in Norrland, 20 kilometres from the nearest tiny town and at least 60 kilometres from any kind of major-ish conurbation.

And my urban antennae still hadn't been evolved out of existence by constant exposure to our new, peaceful surroundings.

In London, the sound of traffic is a constant thrum. Here, when a car drives past our house, we always look out â€" it's a pretty rare event.

We can even tell which neighbour is driving past by the sound of the engine.

Obviously, there is some crime here. There were four or five burglaries in our nearest town a few years ago and the media had a field day. It was front page news for a week and columnists were predicting the end of Norrland civilization. But we survived.

That's almost the strangest thing. People really do think society is about to collapse if there's even the smallest 'crimewave'. What wouldn't even make the gossip grapevine in London becomes huge news here.

When I moved here I was a pretty unapologetic 'big city' type. I spent most of my life living in London. For five years before we move d to Sweden, we lived in Shoreditch.

If we wanted a bottle of wine, our local off-licence was a 30-second walk. Now, it's an 80-minute round trip to the local government alcohol shop, Systembolaget.

I've lost count of the number of last-minute 90 km/h dashes to the local System on a Saturday lunchtime because we have guests coming for dinner and we forgot the shop closes early on Saturday. Planning isn't a big thing in the Connolly DNA.

I love our neighbours. They are some of the kindest, most good-natured, most helpful people we have ever had the pleasure of knowing (and they totally destroy the myth, peddled by southern Swedes, that northerners are unfriendly folk).

When we had twins, just over five years ago, it was tough. But without the kindness of our neighbours, it would have been a lot tougher.

However, I do wish our neighbours wouldn't walk into our house whenever they feel like it.

My gir lfriend was confronted, mid-breastfeed, by two neighbours we didn't even know that well who were keen to see our new daughters. Donna was in the nursery at the time. Upstairs. They had just let themselves in and stomped up the stairs to see who was around.

We now lock our front door when we're at home but not because of people wishing us ill or liking the look of my hi-fi, as was the case in London.

In northern Sweden, we lock our front door to shut out the friendly people.

Paul Connolly is a Skellefteå-based writer and monthly columnist for The Local. Follow him on Facebook and read more of his writing on The Local.

Source: Google News Sweden | Netizen 24 Sweden

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By On November 06, 2018

Their View: Barbara Lunde built relationships, connected Rockford to Sweden

Tuesday

Nov 6, 2018 at 2:04 PM Nov 6, 2018 at 2:04 PM

With the passing of Barbara (Benson) Lunde on Oct. 26, Rockford lost an integral Rockford “ambassador.”

Barbara was immensely proud of her Swedish heritage and showed it in many ways and through many people in the community. Barbara always went above and beyond to make sure any guest or visitor in Rockford saw the best the city had to offer and Barbara always showcased us in the most positive way.

No one who meet Barbara ever forgot her. As a testament to Barbara’s genuine love for Sweden, she relished the opportunity to expand the relationship between Rockford and communities in Sweden. Barbara and John Nelson, who passed away in 2016, were instrumental in forming the international Sister City relationship between Rockford and Borgholm, Sweden, in 2002. Barbara took pride in showing off the countless Swedish-influenced aspects of Rockford.

I, Linnea Bengtsson, first met Barbara in 2008, as a trainee from Rockford´s Industrial Partnership city, Lidköping, Sweden. Barbara welcomed me with open arms. She introduced me to the SwedishAmerican Health System Foundation in 2008. She had a vision to connect Swedish construction students to help with the Foundation's neighborhood housing revitalization project. On Feb. 24, 2009, John Mecklenburg, former vice president of SwedishAmerican (Medical) Foundation, wrote the following letter to the educational director in Lidköping:

“The SwedishAmerican Foundation is extremely excited about the upcoming exchange program with the students from your school. The genesis of the project was formed in the minds of Mrs. Barbara Lunde, representative from Swedish Historical Society and Linnea Bengtsson, an economic development intern from Lidköping, Sweden. Barbara (who is familiar w ith the Foundation´s neighborhood housing revitalization project) and Linnea began ”brainstorming” about the possibility of students from De la Gardie school working with Rockford East High School students building homes.

Today, this relationship has resulted in the opportunity for more than 100 construction and nursing students and faculty from Lidköping to come to Rockford. None of this would have been possible without Barbara´s vision and enthusiasm. To further illustrate Barbara's deep connections to Sweden, Barbara and her husband Richard were invited to a reception with the Swedish King and Queen celebrating the Crown Princess' birthday in Borgholm.

While in Sweden, I, Linnea, got the opportunity to host Barbara and Richard at my home in Sweden. Barbara always enjoyed her coffee times, called ”fika” in Sweden. We had a very memorable fika with my late 90-year-old grandmother.

Barbara worked closely with the Rockford Area Convention & Visitors Bureau (RACVB) for many years. Anytime there was a Swedish group visiting, Barbara would gladly lead the effort in arranging and hosting the tour. Barbara always opened her home up for these visitors, prepared homemade dinners, engaged in meaningful conversation that always made guests at ease and gave them lots of hugs. Most recently, Barbara accepted an invitation to judge this year's Business in Blooming contest hosted by the RACVB where she spent the day judging downtown business’ beautification efforts. Barbara’s passion for Rockford and eye for beautiful things has made a lasting impact of so many of us.

As a result of Barbara’s relationship building between the two countries, there are innumerable people grieving in the US and in Sweden. Word of her passing was met with sadness as well as gratitude for how greatly she impacted their lives.

From 17-year-old construction students to mayors, teachers, nurse students, my family (cousins, uncles, au nts, close friends), Barbara will never be forgotten. The Swedish Historical Society intends to carry on the work of Barbara's relationship-building between Rockford and Sweden.

As for those of us involved with enhancing the connection between Rockford and Sweden, it is our honor to carry on the legacy of Barbara Lunde.

Linnea Bengtsson, international business developer Lidköping & Skaraborg and co-president, Swedish Historical Society; and Lindsay Arellano, vice president of sales and services, Rockford Area Convention & Visitors Bureau.

Source: Google News Sweden | Netizen 24 Sweden